What’s the favorite part of your career? See below for mine-

1 10 2014

keep calm and hug a loan officerTo Whom It May Concern:

My husband and I recently had the pleasure of working with Linda Fox as our Mortgage Lender. We were given several lenders to choose from and Linda happened to be the first one we contacted. From the first few minutes of talking with her, I could tell that she was the right choice. That personal connection was the key!

Buying a home is a difficult situation and Linda did everything in her power to make the process as smooth and easy as possible for us. We had so many questions as we went through the loan process, and Linda was always there with either an immediate email or phone call to answer the question and further clarify anything that we did not understand.

We could not have felt more personally connected to someone than we did with Linda. There was never an issue too small or too big that she did not handle for us.

Early in the loan process we went through two other potential home purchases that did not go through. Linda did not “give up” on us as clients and was supportive and concerned about our situation.

There was always an encouraging email or phone message to see if we were doing ok or to remind us of something that was needed for the loan.

Coming to our closing was definitely not necessary, but by doing so Linda really showed how much she appreciated our business.

I highly recommend Linda Fox as an outstanding Mortgage Loan Officer and have already recommended her to several friends of ours. She is excellent at her job and goes the extra mile to make each of her clients feel special.

-Kim in Lemont

 





A great way to end the week

1 08 2014

I_am_focused_picI would like to take the opportunity to tell you how much I appreciate all of Linda Fox’s assistance with the recent purchase of my home. Linda was very attentive and kept me informed along the way. Linda was able to make an otherwise arduous task, easy. I will definitely recommend Avenue Mortgage and specifically Linda Fox to any prospective home buyers seeking a mortgage.

Sincerely,

LC  in Naperville





7 Steps to Buying a House

30 07 2012

(I love working with home buyers, especially first time home buyers! I think they went a little light on the last step, but it is a good summary.)

Find out how much you can afford.

Before your first steps to buying a new home, your mortgage lender will look at a couple different numbers to find out your spending limit. The first figure is your take-home pay. Banks like to follow the 28/36 rule: Your monthly mortgage payments should total no more than 28 percent of your net paycheck, and your total debts, including car payments and student loans, shouldn’t inch over 36 percent.

Get preapproved for a loan.

For a small fee, a lender will contact your employer, bank, and others to verify your income, assets, debts, and credit history. You’ll then get a letter stating that your mortgage is approved for a certain amount (which will help you determine your price limit!) up until a certain date. This document is more for the home seller’s benefit to prove that you’re a serious buyer. There’s no obligation on your part to actually get a mortgage.

Start searching for new digs.

A good way to start is to look at advertisements of homes located in neighborhoods you might want to check out. Then see who the listing agent is — chances are that company does a decent amount of business in the neighborhoods you’re interested in. Also use our finding a home tool.

Make an offer.

Do your own research in your local paper, office of public records, or Zillow to find out what similar homes in the area have recently sold for. Choose a number for your initial offer. If it’s far below the asking price, be prepared to defend it with your research. Don’t let your real estate agent pressure you into making the first number any higher than you’re comfortable with.

Settle on a price.

The seller will respond in one of three ways: an acceptance, a counter-bid (giving you a number somewhere between your offer and the asking price), or declining by sticking to their original asking price. Find out why the sellers are digging in their heels. If you can agree on a number, you’ll sign a contract and be asked to put down a “binder” or “earnest money.” Make sure the contract specifies that you can get this money back if you withdraw your offer.

Get an inspection.

Ask a realtor to recommend a certified inspector or check out the American Society of Home Inspectors. Have our home inspection checklist handy.

Close the deal.

Once the inspection is done, you’ll need to contact your lender and hire a lawyer to set up a closing date. Go buy some champagne and celebrate!

via 7 Steps to Buying a House – Buying a Home – Real Estate.





Buying a Home Won’t Get Much Cheaper | AOL Real Estate

7 05 2012

Buying a Home Won’t Get Much Cheaper By CNNMoney | Posted May 3rd 2012 1:02PM

By Les Christie

Buying a home may never get any cheaper than this. Several housing experts are predicting that this year will be the last chance for bargain hunters to cash in on the best deals of the weak housing market.

With home prices down 34% nationally since 2006 and mortgage rates at historic lows, homes have never been more affordable — but it won’t stay this way for much longer.

Stuart Hoffman, chief economist for PNC Financial Services, said he expects home prices to flatten out by the third quarter and start climbing by next year.

A number of factors will help bolster the housing market, he said, including a decline in the number of foreclosures and continued job growth. In addition, homebuyers will have better access to mortgages as they get their finances in order and improve their credit scores.

“This is a strong indicator that we will start seeing home price indexes, like the S&P/Case-Shiller, start to report home price increases this summer,” he said.

Prospective homebuyers who’ve been sitting on the fence shouldn’t worry if they aren’t quite ready to make the leap. Analysts are predicting that the initial price gains will be modest, at least, in most markets.

Read more at CNNMoney.

via Buying a Home Won’t Get Much Cheaper | AOL Real Estate.